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Classic Sports Card of The Day

24 Dec

85toppscliffbranch

1985 Topps football card of former wide receiver Cliff Branch, who played 15 seasons in the NFL for the Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders. A former college track star, he held the NFL records for career playoff receptions and receiving yards until Jerry Rice broke them in the 1990s. Branch, who passed away in 2019, was a four-time Pro Bowler and a major contributor to 3 Raider Super Bowl titles.

 

NFL – Throwback Thursday: Walking The Walk?

19 Dec

The Detroit Lions take on the Denver Broncos this week in the penultimate game for the NFL teams. For this week’s Throwback Thursday post, we’ll travel back to a strange time in pro football’s history, the 1967 preseason. This is the second time we’ve featured a game from that year that was just an exhibition contest, but was really much more. On October 28, 2015 we highlighted a game between the Chiefs and Bears from that same preseason. To set up the story we need to remind people who didn’t witness that period of what it was all about. It was 1967, the start of the first season following Green Bay’s demolition of Kansas City in the first AFL/NFL Championship game, which would later become the Super Bowl. It was also the first time, according to the terms of the merger of the 2 leagues, that teams from the rival leagues were allowed to play exhibition games against each other. In prior years the preseason would be a time when players came into training camp from the second jobs they held in order to survive and used the time to get back into football shape. This preseason was going to be drastically different. The NFL had long stated that their upstart rivals were “a Mickey Mouse operation” and a vastly inferior product made up of players who couldn’t cut it in the older, established league. The AFL clubs felt they had advanced to the point where they could compete with the older league, Green Bay’s championship dominance not withstanding. Packer coach Vince Lombardi had added fuel to the fire when he stated in an interview following that first Super Bowl that although he thought that Kansas City was a fine club, that there were numerous teams in the NFL that were better.

In this particular exhibition game, played on August 5, 1967, there was quite a bit of skepticism about the upstart AFL among Lions’ players. The Broncos, for one thing, were the absolute worst of all the teams in the new league, having never posted a winning record. Also, Denver had opened the ’67 preseason with an embarrassing 19-2 loss to the Miami Dolphins, an expansion team in the previous season. Detroit’s outspoken defensive lineman, Alex Karras, openly laughed at the prospect of facing the downtrodden Broncos, and before this game boasted that if his team lost to the Broncos he would walk home from Denver. The Broncos banded together and played an outstanding game. Their defense stymied the Lions’ attack, while their offense managed a field goal to take a 3-0 lead. A key play happened in the third quarter when Denver punter Bob Scarpitto faked a kick and ran for a first down, extending a drive that ended with aging fullback Cookie Gilchrist plunging into the end zone from a yard out to open up the lead to 10-0. The Lions came back to score in the fourth quarter on a Milt Plum touchdown pass but Denver added a field goal and hung on for a shocking 13-7 victory. Detroit coach Joe Schmidt handled the defeat with class, praising the Broncos’ effort and desire and adding that the new league was on par with the NFL. Although some Lion players expressed disbelief in the result, Karras didn’t have much to say after the loss. He just put his tail between his legs and quietly took the team flight back to Detroit. As for the AFL/NFL preseason competition that year, the older league wound up dominating, winning 13 of 16 contests. Two of the AFL’s 3 wins were recorded by the lowly Broncos.

 

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Lions vs. Broncos action from 1967 preseason

 

Classic Team Logo of The Day

19 Dec

sarniaimperials

Logo of an old Canadian football team that played in the Ontario Rugby Football Union, the Sarnia Imperials. The ORFU preceded the Canadian Football League and competed for the Grey Cup until 1955. The Imperials won the Cup twice, in 1934 and 1936. Some notable players who competed for Sarnia are Norm Perry, Orm Beach, Gino Cappelletti and Cookie Gilchrist.

 

Classic Sports Card of The Day

19 Dec

68toppsscarpitto

1968 Topps football card of former NFL flanker/punter Bob Scarpitto, who played eight seasons of pro ball in the American Football League for 3 different teams, most notably the Denver Broncos. He was an AFL All Star in 1966 and was named to the AFL’s All Time second team. He still holds team records for punting, including most punts in a game and a season, a reflection of how bad the 1960s Denver teams were.

 

NFL 100 – The College Draft

18 Dec

How does the National Football League maintain it’s position as the most popular sport in the country? One of the main reasons is the parity developed through the use of the yearly draft of college talent. This NFL 100 feature will explore the evolution of this process over the years. The first draft wasn’t held until 1936, and prior to that it was chaos when it came to player procurement. Players would hold out and sign with the highest bidder, and there was even a case where Steelers’ owner Art Rooney, with his team having no chance to play in the postseason, gave the New York Giants permission to use 2 of his players. The Boston Redskins protested the move and the league commissioner at the time, Joe Carr, disallowed it. After that incident, the waiver claim rule that exists today was put into place. Eventually, Philadelphia Eagles’ owner, and future commissioner Bert Bell proposed the idea of the annual draft to make acquiring talent more fair to each team. His idea was unanimously accepted by the owners and the first draft took place in 1936. The first player ever selected, Jay Berwanger, never played in the NFL. At the time college football was considered a superior game to the pros, and many players saw it as a step down to turn pro. The Eagles had drafted Berwanger and traded his rights to the Chicago Bears when they couldn’t sign him. Bears’ owner George Halas was also unsuccessful in signing him, and Berwanger took a job with a rubber company. Only 24 of the 81 players drafted in that first year of selecting chose to play in the NFL.

 

Joe Stydahar

Hall of Famer Joe Stydahar, Bears’ first pick in the ’36 draft

Giants’ owner Wellington Mara could be considered the father of modern day scouting, as he subscribed to magazines and out-of-town newspapers to collect information on players across the country. In a sad anecdote to the selecton process, the best player of 1939 was unequivocally Kenny Washington, but when word spread that he was African-American, no team selected him in the 1940 draft. The first actual scout was Eddie Kotal, who was hired in 1946 by the Los Angeles Rams. Coincidentally, the Rams signed Washington, and his UCLA teammate Woody Strode, in ’46. Scouting became the norm for all teams if they wanted to stay competitive, but the draft itself didn’t garner much attention. In 1960, with the inception of the AFL bringing competition, the NFL put a lot more emphasis on the process, since the teams would have to bid against clubs from the new league for players. When the leagues agreed to a merger in 1966 part of the agreement, and a very important part, was the creation of a “common draft” in which the competing leagues would draft as one unit, ending the bidding wars for talent. Commissioner Pete Rozelle would oversee the selections using a blackboard, and in 1970, when the merger was completed and the teams officially merged into one NFL, he graduated to a white board.

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Pete Rozelle presides over the 1970 NFL draft

In 1980, the brand new cable network, ESPN, was looking for content to fill their air time, and the network’s president, Chet Simmons, approached Rozelle with the idea of televising the selection process. Although the commissioner thought it would be boring television viewing, he agreed. The draft didn’t do very well on TV until 1988, when it was moved from the middle of the week to the weekend. Suddenly, a new cottage industry of “draftniks” emerged, people like Joel Buchbaum and Mel Kiper, who provided advanced scouting information on the college prospects for the television viewers and through publications. The selection process has grown into a must-see monster of a production today, spread out over three days with the opening round on Thursday night. That opening round is treated as if it were a Hollywood award show, with a red carpet pre-draft show and drama created over every selection. Combined with free agency, the combine and it’s own NFL Network, the draft is just another example of how popular the NFL has become in this modern age, becoming the true national pastime not only during it’s actual season but it’s entire offseason as well.

 

 

Classic Team Logo of The Day

18 Dec

GWUColonials

Logo of a defunct college football team, the George Washington University Colonials, whose program existed from 1881 until 1966, when it shut down for various reasons, including not having a suitable stadium to play in. They won their only bowl game appearance, capturing the Sun Bowl in 1956. Colonial alumni who played pro football include Mike Sommer, Bob Nowaskey, Garry Lyle and Hall of Famer Tuffy Leemans.

 

Classic Sports Card of The Day

18 Dec

58bowmanleonhart

1958 Bowman football card of former pro football end/fullback Leon Hart, who played eight seasons in the NFL for the Detroit Lions. He was the top choice of the 1950 college draft, the year the NFL absorbed teams from the AAFC. Playing during the last Lions’ glory era of the 1950s, Hart was a Pro Bowler in 1951 and helped the Lions win 3 NFL championships during the decade. After retiring from football, he ran a manufacturing business that made equipment for balancing tires.

 

NFL 100 – Don Hutson

17 Dec

In today’s NFL, wide receivers are putting up unprecedented numbers for receptions and yardage with such a heavy emphasis on the passing game. Today’s NFL 100 subject is a player who thrived in the passing game in an era that was mostly the old fashioned “three yards and a cloud of dust” style of play. He is Don Hutson, Green Bay Packers’ split end in the Curley Lambeau dynasty days of the 1930s and 1940s. His numbers pale in comparison with the 100+ catch seasons that the best receivers are putting up today, but even with his more pedestrian statistics some of the numbers stand out. When he retired after the 1945 season, Hutson owned 23 different NFL records, 13 of which he still holds. His best season came in 1942 when he caught 74 passes for 1,211 yards and 17 touchdowns. The 17 receiving TDs still ranks tied for 5th on the all time single season list. He averaged 24.9 yards per reception in 1939, an amazing total for that era. His 99 career receiving touchdowns rank 11th on the all time list, but he and Steve Largent are the only players in the top 12 who didn’t play in the pass-happy 1990s/2000s. Coach Lambeau’s Packers relied heavily on their passing attack, with quarterback Arnie Herber and later Cecil Isbell hooking up with Hutson and Johnny “Blood” McNally, with Hutson being the main weapon. As with most players of his era, Hutson excelled on both sides of the ball. He played safety on defense, led the NFL in interceptions in 1940 and had 30 career picks. He also served as the team’s placekicker, and stayed on as an assistant coach for Green Bay for 5 seasons after retiring as a player.

 

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Don Hutson snares a pass for the Packers

Take a look at his 11 year career resume and it’s easy to see that he stacks up as one of the greatest players in NFL history, despite playing in a long forgotten era: Three-time NFL champion, eight-time All Pro, two-time NFL Most Valuable Player, nine-time season leader in receiving touchdowns, eight-time single season receptions leader, seven-time receiving yards leader, NFL All Decade Team for the 1930s, Packer Hall of Fame and jersey # 14 retired, NFL’s 75th Anniversary team, member of Pro Football Hall of Fame’s inaugural class of 1963, and recently named one of 24 wide receiver finalists for the NFL’s 100th season All Time team. He is almost certain to be chosen as one of the 10 players for that honor. For his contribution to the modern passing game alone, Hutson is without a doubt one of the game’s true pioneers.

 

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Don Hutson’s eye black game rivals today’s players

 

Classic Team Logo of The Day

17 Dec

bahamasbowl

The college football bowl season will be upon us starting this weekend, and this is the logo of the first of those games to be played this year, the Makers Wanted Bahamas Bowl. Formerly known as the Popeyes Bahamas Bowl, it has been played since 2014. Located in Nassau, the game matches teams from the Mid-America Conference and Conference USA, with this year’s contest being played between the University at Buffalo Bulls and the Charlotte 49ers.

 

Classic Sports Card of The Day

17 Dec

63stancraftmcnally

1963 Stancraft football card of former pro football end Johnny “Blood” McNally, an early pioneer who played 15 years with 5 different teams starting in 1925, when the NFL was in its’ infancy. He had his most success with the Green Bay Packers, spending a total of 7 years with them in 2 different stints. He was a member of 4 championship teams with the Packers. McNally spent 4 years in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II after retiring as a player. He was named to the NFL’s All Decade team of the 1930s, and was part of the first class of players to be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1963.